Howl

“I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness, starving hysterical naked, / dragging themselves through the negro streets at dawn looking for an angry fix / angelheaded hipsters burning for the ancient heavenly connection to the starry dynamo in the machinery of night”

Howl by Allen Ginsberg

The Road Not Taken

“Two roads diverged in a wood, and I – / I took the one less traveled by, / And that has made all the difference.”

The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost

Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night, Dylan Thomas

Do not go gentle into that good night,

Old age should burn and rave at close of day;

Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Oh Yes, Charles Bukowski

there are worse things than

being alone

but it often takes decades

to realize this

and most often

when you do

it’s too late

and there’s nothing worse

than

too late.

Leaves of Grass

I bequeath myself to the dirt to grow from the grass I love / If you want me again look for me under your boot-soles

Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman

Hope Is The Thing With Feathers

“Hope is the thing with feathers / That perches in the soul, / And sings the tune without the words, / And never stops at all,”

Hope Is The Thing With Feathers by Emily Dickinson

To My Wife

“And when wind and winter harden / All the loveless land, / It will whisper of the garden, / You will understand.”

To My Wife by Oscar Wilde

I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud

“I wandered lonely as a cloud / That floats on high o’er vales and hills, / When all at once I saw a crowd, / A host of golden daffodils”

I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud, William Wordsworth

Digging

“Between my finger and my thumb/ The squat pen rests; as snug as a gun.”

Digging, Seamus Heaney

Dulce et Decorum est by Wilfred Owen

“Bent double, like old beggars under sacks, / Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge, / Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs / And towards our distant rest began to trudge.”

Dulce et Decorum est, Wilfred Owen

Daddy by Sylvia Plath

“At twenty I tried to die / And get back, back, back to you. / I thought even the bones would do. / But they pulled me out of the sack, / And they stuck me together with glue.”

Daddy, Sylvia Plath

Stop all the clocks by W H Auden

“He was my North, my South, my East and West. / My working week and my Sunday rest. / My noon, my midnight, my talk, my song. / I thought that love would last for ever: I was wrong.”

Stop All The Clocks, WH Auden

The Minotaur

“The bloody end of the skein / That unravelled your marriage, / Left your children echoing / Like tunnels in a labyrinth.”

The Minotaur, Ted Hughes

In Flanders Fields

“We are the Dead. Short days ago / We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow, / Loved and were loved, and now we lie / In Flanders Fields.”

In Flanders Fields, John McCrae

The Charge of the Light Brigade

“Storm’d at with shot and shell, / Boldly they rode and well, / Into the jaws of Death, / Into the mouth of Hell / Rode the six hundred.”

The Charge of the Light Brigade, Alfred Lord Tennyson

If

“If you can fill the unforgiving minute / With sixty seconds’ worth of distance run – / Yours is the Earth and everything that’s in it, / And – which is more – you’ll be a Man my son!”

If, Rudyard Kipling

I Carry Your Heart With Me

“here is the deepest secret nobody knows / (here is the root of the root and the bud of the bud / and the sky of the sky of a tree called life; which grows /higher than the soul can hope or mind can hide) / and this is the wonder that’s keeping the stars apart / i carry your heart (i carry it in my heart)”

i carry your heart with me, EE Cummings

O Captain! My Captain!

“O Captain! my Captain! our fearful trip is done; / The ship has weather’d every rack, the prize we sought is won;”

O Captain! My Captain!, Walt Whitman

A Dream Within A Dream

“I stand amid the roar / Of a surf-tormented shore, / And I hold within my hand / Grains of the golden sand– / How few! yet how they creep / Through my fingers to the deep, / While I weep – while I weep!”

A Dream Within A Dream, Edgar Allan Poe

Warning

“When I am an old woman, I shall wear purple / with a red hat that doesn’t go, and doesn’t suit me / And I shall spend my pension on brandy and summer gloves / and satin candles, and say we’ve no money for butter.”

Warning, Jenny Joseph

I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings, Maya Angelou

“The caged bird sings with a fearful trill / Of things unknown but longed for still / And his tune is heard on the distant hill / For the caged bird sings of freedom.”

I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings, Maya Angelou

How Do I Love Thee?

“How do I love thee? Let me count the ways. / I love thee to the depth and breadth and height / My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight / For the ends of being and ideal grace.”

How Do I Love Thee?, Elizabeth Barrett Browning

The Soldier

“If I should die, think only this of me: / That there’s some corner of a foreign field / That is forever England.”

The Soldier, Rupert Brooke

Kubla Khan

“In Xanadu did Kubla Khan / A stately pleasure-dome decree / Where Alph, the sacred river, ran / Through caverns measureless to man / Down to a sunless sea.”

Kubla Khan, Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Ode to Autumn

“Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness! / Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun; / Conspiring with him how to load and bless / With fruit the vines that round the thatch-eaves run”

Ode to Autumn, John Keats

Sonnet 18

“Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day? / Thou art more lovely and more temperate”

Sonnet 18, William Shakespeare

To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time

“Gather ye rosebuds while ye may, / Old time is still a-flying: / And this same flower that smiles to-day / To-morrow will be dying.”

To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time, Robert Herrick

The Panther

“As he paces in cramped circles, over and over, / the movement of his powerful soft strides / is like a ritual dance around a center / in which a mighty will stands paralyzed”

The Panther, Rainer Maria Rilke

Paradise Lost

“Of Man’s first disobedience, and the fruit / Of that forbidden tree whose mortal taste / Brought death into the World, and all our woe, / With loss of Eden, till one greater Man / Restore us, and regain the blissful seat, / Sing, Heavenly Muse”

Paradise Lost, John Milton

Phenomenal Woman

The span of my hips, / The stride of my step, / The curl of my lips. / I’m a woman / Phenomenally. / Phenomenal woman, / That’s me.”

Phenomenal Woman, Maya Angelou

Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening

“The woods are lovely, dark and deep, / But I have promises to keep, / And miles to go before I sleep, / And miles to go before I sleep.”

Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening, Robert Frost

If You Forget Me

“But / if each day, / each hour, / you feel that you are destined for me / with implacable sweetness, / if each day a flower / climbs up to your lips to seek me, / ah my love, ah my own, / in me all that fire is repeated”

If You Forget Me, Pablo Neruda

Let America Be America Again

“I am the poor white, fooled and pushed apart, / I am the Negro bearing slavery’s scars. / I am the red man driven from the land, / I am the immigrant clutching the hope I seek – / And finding only the same old stupid plan /Of dog eat dog, of mighty crush the weak.”

Let America Be America Again, Langston Hughes

Heart, we will forget him!

“Heart, we will forget him, You and I, tonight! / You must forget the warmth he gave, I will forget the light. / When you have done pray tell me, Then I, my thoughts, will dim. Haste! ‘lest while you’re lagging / I may remember him!”

Heart, We Will Forget Him! Emily Dickinson

If You Think You are Beaten

“Life’s battles don’t always go / To the stronger or faster man. / But sooner or later the man who wins, / Is the man who thinks he can.”

If You Think You are Beaten, Walter D. Wintle

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

“Water, water, every where, / And all the boards did shrink; / Water, water, every where / Nor any drop to drink.”

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Trees

“A tree that looks at God all day, / And lifts her leafy arms to pray; / A tree that may in Summer wear / A nest of robins in her hair; / Upon whose bosom snow has lain; / Who intimately lives with rain.”

Trees, Joyce Kilmer

Strange Fruit

“Southern trees bear a strange fruit, / Blood on the leaves and blood at the root, / Black body swinging in the Southern breeze, / Strange fruit hanging from the poplar trees.”

Strange Fruit, Abel Meeropol

When You are Old

“When you are old and grey and full of sleep, / And nodding by the fire, take down this book / And slowly read, and dream of the soft look / Your eyes had once, and of their shadows deep”

When You are Old, W. B. Yeats

Suicide in the Trenches

“You smug-faced crowds with kindling eye / Who cheer when soldier lads march by, / Sneak home and pray you’ll never know / The hell where youth and laughter go.”

Suicide in the Trenches, Siegfried Sassoon

An Evening

“Scarcely a tear to shed; / Hardly a word to say; / The end of a summer day;/ Sweet Love dead.”

An Evening, Gwendolyn Brooks

When a Woman Loves a Man

“When a woman loves a man, they have gone / to swim naked in the stream / on a glorious July day / with the sound of the waterfall like a chuckle / of water rushing over smooth rocks, / and there is nothing alien in the universe.”

When a Woman Loves a Man, David Lehman

Dear, Though the Night Is Gone

“Our whisper woke no clocks, / We kissed and I was glad / At everything you did, / Indifferent to those / Who sat with hostile eyes / In pairs on every bed, / Arms round each other’s neck, / Inert and vaguely sad.”

“Dear, Though the Night Is Gone”, WH Auden

A Girl

“Tree you are, / Moss you are, / You are violets with wind above them. / A child – so high – you are, / And all this is folly to the world.”

A Girl, Ezra Pound

Happiness

“Happiness. It comes on / unexpectedly. And goes beyond, really, / any early morning talk about it.”

Happiness, Raymond Carver

Fast Rode The Knight

“Fast rode the knight / With spurs, hot and reeking, / Ever waving an eager sword, / ‘To save my lady!'”

Fast Rode The Knight, Stephen Crane

The Tide Rises, the Tide Falls

“Darkness settles on roofs and walls, / But the sea, the sea in the darkness calls; / The little waves, with their soft, white hands / Efface the footprints in the sands, / And the tide rises, the tide falls.”

The Tide Rises, The Tide Falls, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

The Raven

“But the raven, sitting lonely on the placid bust, spoke only, / That one word, as if his soul in that one word he did outpour. / Nothing further then he uttered – not a feather then he fluttered – / Till I scarcely more than muttered `Other friends have flown before – / On the morrow he will leave me, as my hopes have flown before.’ / Then the bird said, `Nevermore.'”

The Raven, Edgar Allan Poe

A Red, Red Rose

“O, my Luve’s like a red, red rose, / That’s newly sprung in June. / O, my Luve’s like the melodie / That’s sweetly played in tune.”

A Red, Red Rose, Robert Burns

The Children’s Hour

“Between the dark and the daylight. / When the night is beginning to lower, / Comes a pause in the day’s occupations. / That is known as the Children’s Hour.”

The Children’s Hour, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

When We Two Parted

“When we two parted / In silence and tears, / Half broken-hearted / To sever for years, / Pale grew thy cheek and cold, / Colder thy kiss; / Truly that hour foretold / Sorrow to this.”

When We Two Parted, George (Lord) Byron

By Mary Oliver

Tell me, what is it you plan to do

with your one wild and precious life?

– Mary Oliver

By Lord Byron

She walks in beauty, like the night

Of cloudless climes and starry skies;

And all that’s best of dark and bright

Meet in her aspect and her eyes…

– Lord Byron

By W.H. Auden

He was my North, my South, my East and West.

My working week and my Sunday rest.

My noon, my midnight, my talk, my song.

I thought that love would last for ever: I was wrong.

~W.H. Auden

By W. B. Yeats

Turning and turning in the widening gyre

The falcon cannot hear the falconer;

Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;

Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,

The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere

The ceremony of innocence is drowned.

The best lack all conviction, while the worst

Are full of passionate intensity.

~W.B. Yeats

By Sylvia Plath

Dying is an art.

Like everything else,

I do it exceptionally well.

I do it so it feels like hell.

I do it so it feels real.

I guess you could say I have a call.

– Sylvia Plath

By David Whyte

Sometimes it takes darkness and the sweet

confinement of your aloneness

to learn

anything or anyone

that does not bring you alive

is too small for you.

~David Whyte

By T. S. Eliot

For last year’s words belong to last year’s language

And next year’s words await another voice.

And to make an end is to make a beginning.

~T.S. Eliot

Edna St. Vincent Millay

Time does not bring relief; you all have lied

Who told me time would ease me of my pain!

I miss him in the weeping of the rain;

I want him at the shrinking of the tide;

The old snows melt from every mountain-side,

And last year’s leaves are smoke in every lane;

But last year’s bitter loving must remain.

~Edna St. Vincent Millay

By Pablo Neruda

so I wait for you like a lonely house

till you will see me again and live in me.

Till then my windows ache.

~Pablo Neruda

Charles Bukowski

I will remember the kisses

our lips raw with love

and how you gave me

everything you had

and how I

offered you what was left of

me.

~Charles Bukowski

By Mary Oliver

to live in this world

you must be able

to do three things

to love what is mortal;

to hold it

against your bones knowing

your own life depends on it;

and, when the time comes to let it go,

to let it go

~Mary Oliver

By E. E. Cummings

I carry your heart with me (I carry it in

my heart)I am never without it (anywhere

I go you go,my dear; and whatever is done

by only me is your doing,my darling)

– E. E. Cummings

By Anne Sexton

As it has been said:

Love and a cough

cannot be concealed.

Even a small cough.

Even a small love.

~Anne Sexton

By Edna St. Vincent Millay

We were so wholly one I had not thought

That we could die apart. I had not thought

That I could move,—and you be stiff and still!

That I could speak,—and you perforce be dumb!

I think our heart-strings were, like warp and woof

In some firm fabric, woven in and out;

Your golden filaments in fair design

Across my duller fibre.

~Edna St. Vincent Millay

By Brian Andreas

I carry you with me into the world,

into the smell of rain

& the words that dance between people

& for me, it will always be this way,

walking in the light,

remembering being alive together

~Brian Andreas

Because I Could Not Stop For Death By Emily Dickinson

Because I could not stop for Death, / He kindly stopped for me; / The carriage held but just ourselves / And Immortality

‘Because I could not stop for Death’, Emily Dickinson

To My Wife by Oscar Wilde

And when wind and winter harden / All the loveless land, / It will whisper of the garden, / You will understand

‘To My Wife’, Oscar Wilde

Dark Pines Under Water by Gwendolyn MacEwen

But the dark pines of your mind dip deeper / And you are sinking, sinking, sleeper / In an elementary world; There is something down there and you want it told

‘Dark Pines Under Water’, Gwendolyn MacEwen

The Hollow Men By T.S Eliot

This is the way the world ends / not with a bang but a whimper

‘The Hollow Men’, T.S Eliot

Lady Lazarus by Sylvia Plath

Out of the ash I rise / With my red hair / And I eat men like air

‘Lady Lazarus’, Sylvia Plath

Dulce et Decorum est By Wilfred Owen

Bent double, like old beggars under sacks, / Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge, / Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs / And towards our distant rest began to trudge.

‘Dulce et Decorum est’, Wilfred Owen

Sonnet XVII by Neruda

I love you as certain dark things are to be loved / in secret, between the shadow and the soul.

‘Sonnet XVII’, Neruda

Variation on the Word Sleep By Margaret Atwood

I would like to be the air / that inhabits you for a moment / only. I would like to be that unnoticed / & that necessary

‘Variation on the Word Sleep’, Margaret Atwood

they speak whatever’s on their mind / they do whatever’s in their pants / the boys i mean are not refined / they shake the mountains when they dance

‘the boys i mean are not refined’, E. E. Cummings

Captain! My Captain! By Walt Whitman

O Captain! my Captain! our fearful trip is done; / The ship has weather’d every rack, the prize we sought is won

‘O Captain! My Captain!’, Walt Whitman

Cuz He’s Black by Javon Johnson

Don’t like the / fact that he learned to hide from the cops before he knew / how to read. Angrier that his survival depends more on his ability / to deal with the “authorities” than it does his own literacy

‘Cuz He’s Black’, Javon Johnson

Song by Allen Ginsberg

The weight of the world / is love / Under the burden / of solitude, / under the burden / of dissatisfaction / the weight, / the weight we carry / is love

‘Song’, Allen Ginsberg

I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings By Maya Angelou

The caged bird sings with a fearful trill/ Of things unknown but longed for still/ And his tune is heard on the distant hill/ For the caged bird sings of freedom

‘I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings’, Maya Angelou

The Second Coming by William Butler Yeats

The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere / The ceremony of innocence is drowned; / The best lack all conviction, while the worst / Are full of passionate intensity

‘The Second Coming’, William Butler Yeats

Dirge Without Music By Edna St. Vincent Millay

Down, down, down into the darkness of the grave / Gently they go, the beautiful, the tender, the kind; / Quietly they go, the intelligent, the witty, the brave. / I know. But I do not approve. And I am not resigned

‘Dirge Without Music’, Edna St. Vincent Millay

Eloisa to Abelard by Alexander Pope

How happy is the blameless vestal’s lot! / The world forgetting, by the world forgot. / Eternal sunshine of the spotless mind! / Each pray’r accepted, and each wish resign’d

‘Eloisa to Abelard’, Alexander Pope

Sonnet 116 by William Shakespeare

Love is not love Which alters when it alteration finds, / Or bends with the remover to remove: / O no; it is an ever-fixed mark, / That looks on tempests, and is never shake

‘Sonnet 116’, William Shakespeare

A Girl by Ezra Pound

Tree you are, / Moss you are, / You are violets with wind above them. / A child – so high – you are, / And all this is folly to the world

‘A Girl’, Ezra Pound

Still I Rise By Mary Angelou

You may write me down in history / With your bitter, twisted lies, / You may trod me in the very dirt / But still, like dust, I’ll rise

‘Still I Rise’, Maya Angelou

The Unblinking Grief By Charles Bukowski

you are much more than simply dead/ I am a dish for your ashes / I am a fist for your vanished air / the most terrible thing about life/ is finding it gone

‘The Unblinking Grief’, Charles Bukowski

Daddy by Sylvia Plath

At twenty I tried to die / And get back, back, back to you. / I thought even the bones would do./ But they pulled me out of the sack, / And they stuck me together with glue

‘Daddy’, Sylvia Plath

Masks by Shel Silverstein

She had blue skin,/ and so did he./ He kept it hid/ and so did she./ They looked for blue/ their whole life through./ Then passed right by–/ and never knew

‘Masks’, Shel Silverstein

Water, water, every where, / And all the boards did shrink; / Water, water, every where / Nor any drop to drink

‘The Rime of the Ancient Mariner’, Samuel Taylor Coleridge

I am the poor white, fooled and pushed apart / I am the Negro bearing slavery’s scars / I am the red man driven from the land, / I am the immigrant clutching the hope I seek – / And finding only the same old stupid plan / Of dog eat dog, of mighty crush the weak

‘Let America Be America Again’, Langston Hughes

You smug-faced crowds with kindling eye / Who cheer when soldier lads march by, / Sneak home and pray you’ll never know / The hell where youth and laughter go

‘Suicide in the Trenches’, Siegfried Sassoon

50. The mind is its own place, and in itself/[Can make a Heav’n of Hell, a Hell of Heav’n] 403,000 Milton

49. Full fathom five thy father lies 438,000 Shakespeare

48. If you can keep your head when all about you 447,000Kipling

47. How do I love thee? Let me count the ways 467,000Elizabeth Barrett Browning

46. If music be the food of love, play on 507,000 Shakespeare

45. We few, we happy few, we band of brothers 521,000Shakespeare

44. What is this life if, full of care,/We have no time to stand and stare 528,000 W.H. Davies

43. The moving finger writes; and, having writ,/Moves on571,000 Edward Fitzgerald

42. They also serve who only stand and wait 584,000 Milton

41. The quality of mercy is not strained 589,000 Shakespeare

40. In Xanadu did Kubla Khan 594,000 Coleridge

39. Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears 615,000Shakespeare

38. Shall I compare thee to a summers day 638,000 Shakespeare

37. Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness 641,000 Keats

36. A thing of beauty is a joy forever 649,000 Keats

35. Do not go gentle into that good night 665,000 Dylan Thomas

34. Busy old fool, unruly sun 675,000 John Donne

33. Stop all the clocks, cut off the telephone 741,000 Auden

32. Human kind/Cannot bear very much reality 891,000 T.S. Eliot

31. O Romeo, Romeo; wherefore art thou Romeo 912,000Shakespeare

30. The lady doth protest too much, methinks 929,000Shakespeare

29. The old lie: Dulce et Decorum Est 990,000 Wilfred Owen

28. Rose is a rose is a rose is a rose 1,050,000 Gertrude Stein

27. When I am an old woman I shall wear purple 1,060,000Jenny Joseph

I think that I shall never see/A poem lovely as a tree. 1,080,000 Joyce Kilmer

Hope springs eternal in the human breast 1,080,000 Alexander Pope

24. When in disgrace with fortune and men’s eyes 1,100,000Shakespeare

23. I grow old… I grow old…/I shall wear the bottoms of my trousers rolled 1,140,000 T.S. Eliot

22. ‘The time has come’, the Walrus said,/’To talk of many things’1,300,000 Lewis Carroll

21. A narrow fellow in the grass 1,310,000 Emily Dickinson

20. Beauty is truth, truth beauty; that is all 1,470,000 Keats

19. To be or not to be: that is the question 1,640,000 Shakespeare

18. In Flanders fields the poppies blow 1,640,000 John McCrae

17. The proper study of mankind is man 1,770,000 Alexander Pope

16. A little learning is a dangerous thing 1,860,000 Alexander Pope

15. But at my back I always hear 2,010,000 Marvell

14. Candy/Is dandy/But liquor/Is quicker 2,150,000 Ogden Nash

13. My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun 2,230,000Shakespeare

12. Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold 2,330,000W.B.Yeats

11. Because I could not stop for death/He kindly stopped for me 2,360,000 Emily Dickinson

10. Tis better to have loved and lost/Than never to have loved at all 2,400,000 Tennyson

9. Look on my works, ye mighty, and despair 3,080,000 Shelley

8. To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield 3,140,000 Tennyson

7. Tread softly because you tread on my dreams 4,860,000 W.B. Yeats

6. Not with a bang but a whimper 5,280,000 T.S. Eliot

5. And miles to go before I sleep 5,350,000 Robert Frost

4. I wandered lonely as a cloud 8,000,000 Wordsworth

3. The child is father of the man 9,420,000 Wordsworth

2. I am the master of my fate 14,700,000 William Ernest Henley

To err is human; to forgive, divine 14,800,000 Alexander Pope

On World Poetry Day we pay tribute to some brilliant poets who penned poignant and lyrical lines of verse

Behold, our edit of lyrical lines penned by brilliant minds. From Sylvia Plath’s longing dream reflections to Maya Angelou’s empowered rally cry – these poignant verses are for reading out loud, reflecting on and committing to memory.

Hope Is The Thing With Feathers, Emily Dickinson

Hope is the thing with feathers

That perches in the soul,

And sings the tune without the words,

And never stops at all,

Read more at https://www.marieclaire.co.uk/entertainment/books/best-lines-from-poetry-13501#v59AH5kkVp4piASa.99

Sonnet 116, William Shakespeare

Love is not love

Which alters when it alteration finds,

Or bends with the remover to remove.

O no, it is an ever-fixed mark

That looks on tempests and is never shaken;

I Carry Your Heart With Me, EE Cummings

here is the deepest secret nobody knows

(here is the root of the root and the bud of the bud

and the sky of the sky of a tree called life;which grows

higher than soul can hope or mind can hide)

and this is the wonder that’s keeping the stars apart

i carry your heart(i carry it in my heart)

The Latest

image: https://imagesvc.timeincuk.net/v3/keystone/image?url=https://ksassets.timeincuk.net/wp/uploads/sites/46/2018/06/VANESSA-KIRBY-2.jpg&q=82

‘I will talk about Margaret forever’ Vanessa Kirby on The Crown, Time’s Up and the text she got from Helena Bonham Carter

image: https://imagesvc.timeincuk.net/v3/keystone/image?url=https://ksassets.timeincuk.net/wp/uploads/sites/46/2018/07/rexfeatures_9732696t.jpg&q=82

Here are 11 times we fell completely in love with Love Island’s Georgia

image: https://imagesvc.timeincuk.net/v3/keystone/image?url=https://ksassets.timeincuk.net/wp/uploads/sites/46/2018/06/Anrealage-emn-S18-003.jpg&q=82

Eyelash growth serums: what do they actually do?

Expect Nothing, Alice Walker

Wish for nothing larger

Than your own small heart

Or greater than a star;

Tame wild disappointment

With caress unmoved and cold

Make of it a parka

For your soul.

Read more at https://www.marieclaire.co.uk/entertainment/books/best-lines-from-poetry-13501#v59AH5kkVp4piASa.99

Sylvia Plath

The Collected Poems, Sylvia Plath

I dreamed that you bewitched me into bed

And sung me moon-struck, kissed me quite insane.

(I think I made you up inside my head.)

Birthday Letters, Ted Hughes

Nobody wanted your dance,

Nobody wanted your strange glitter, your floundering

Drowning life and your effort to save yourself,

Treading water, dancing the dark turmoil,

Looking for something to give.

If, Rudyard Kipling

If you can fill the unforgiving minute

With sixty seconds’ worth of distance run –

Yours is the Earth and everything that’s in it,

And – which is more – you’ll be a Man my son!

How Do I Love Thee?, Elizabeth Barrett Browning

How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.

I love thee to the depth and breadth and height

My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight

For the ends of being and ideal grace.

Read more at https://www.marieclaire.co.uk/entertainment/books/best-lines-from-poetry-13501#v59AH5kkVp4piASa.99

Maya Angelou

Phenomenal Woman, Maya Angelou

The span of my hips,

The stride of my step,

The curl of my lips.

I’m a woman

Phenomenally.

Phenomenal woman,

That’s me.

These I Can Promise, Mark Twain

I can promise all my heart’s devotion;

A smile to chase away your tears of sorrow;

A love that’s true and ever growing;

A hand to hold in your’s through each tomorrow.

Late Fragment by Raymond Carver

And did you get what

you wanted from this life, even so?

I did.

And what did you want?

To call myself beloved,

to feel myself

beloved on the earth.

Words, Wide Night, Carol Ann Duffy

Somewhere on the other side of this wide night

and the distance between us, I am thinking of you.

The room is turning slowly away from the moon.

Read more at https://www.marieclaire.co.uk/entertainment/books/best-lines-from-poetry-13501#v59AH5kkVp4piASa.99

The Moment, Margaret Atwood

The moment when, after many years

of hard work and a long voyage

you stand in the centre of your room,

house, half-acre, square mile, island, country,

knowing at last how you got there,

and say, I own this,

The Complete Poems, Anne Sexton

Watch out for intellect,

because it knows so much it knows nothing

and leaves you hanging upside down,

mouthing knowledge as your heart

falls out of your mouth.

Right, all we need to do now is find someone to quote this stuff to…

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2. From “One Art” by Elizabeth Bishop:

“It’s evident

the art of losing’s not too hard to master,

though it may look like (Write it!) like disaster.”

3. From “Leaves of Grass” by Walt Whitman:

“I bequeath myself to the dirt to grow from the grass I love,

If you want me again look for me under your boot-soles.”

4. From “Little Red Cap” by Carol Ann Duffy:

“Words, words were truly alive on the tongue, in the head

Warm, beating, frantic, winged; music and blood

But then I was young.”

5. From “Variations on the Word Sleep” by Margaret Atwood:

“I would like to be the air

that inhabits you for a moment

only. I would like to be that unnoticed

and that necessary.”

7. From “Wild Geese” by Mary Oliver:

“You do not have to be good.

You do not have to walk on your knees

For a hundred miles through the desert, repenting.

You only have to let the soft animal of your body

love what it loves.”

8. From “The Starling” by Amy Lowell:

“I weary for desires never guessed,

For alien passions, strange imaginings,

To be some other person for a day.”

9. From “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” by T.S. Eliot:

“For I have known them all already, known them all:

Have known the evenings, mornings, afternoons;

I have measured out my life with coffee spoons.”

10. From “Life is Fine” by Langston Hughes:

“Though you may hear me holler,

And you may see me cry-

I’ll be dogged, sweet baby,

If you gonna see me die.”

12. From “Tactics and Strategy” by Mario Benedetti:

“My strategy is that some day

I don’t know how, nor with what pretext

That finally you need me.”

13. From “The Wasteland” by T.S. Eliot:

“These fragments I have shored

Against my ruins.”

14. From “the boys i mean are not refined” by e. e. cummings:

“they speak whatever’s on their mind

they do whatever’s in their pants

the boys i mean are not refined

they shake the mountains when they dance.”

15. From “To Earthward” by Robert Frost:

“Love at the lips was touch

As sweet as I could bear

And once that seemed too much

I lived on air.”

17. From “List of Demands” by Saul Williams:

“I wrote a song for you today when I was sitting in my room,

I jumped up on the bed today and played it on the broom.

I didn’t think that it would be a song that you would hear,

But when I played it in my head I made you reappear.”

18. From “Funeral Blues” by W.H. Auden:

“He was my North, my South , my East and my West

My working week and my Sunday rest

My noon, my midnight, my talk, my song;

I thought that love would last forever, I was wrong.”

19. From “Almost” by Lang Leav:

“But we were a maybe

and never a must

when it should have been us.”

20. From “‘Cuz He’s Black” by Javon Johnson:

“Don’t like the

fact that he learned to hide from the cops before he knew

how to read. Angrier that his survival depends more on his ability

to deal with the “authorities” than it does his own literacy.”

22. From “The Second Coming” by William Butler Yeats:

“The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere

The ceremony of innocence is drowned;

The best lack all conviction, while the worst

Are full of passionate intensity.”

23. From “Diving into the Wreck” by Adrienne Rich:

“I am having to do this

not like Cousteau with his

assiduous team

aboard the sun-flooded schooner

but here alone.”

24. From “Jabberwocky” by Lewis Carroll:

“`Twas brillig, and the slithy toves

Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:

All mimsy were the borogoves,

And the mome raths outgrab”

25. From “Dirge Without Music” by Edna St. Vincent Millay:

“Down, down, down into the darkness of the grave

Gently they go, the beautiful, the tender, the kind;

Quietly they go, the intelligent, the witty, the brave.

I know. But I do not approve. And I am not resigned.”

27. From “In Celebration of My Uterus” by Anne Sexton:

“Everyone in me is a bird

I am beating all my wings.”

28. From “Bright Star” by John Keats:

“Still, still to hear her tender-taken breath,

And so live ever—or else swoon to death.”

Suggested by Justine VP., via Facebook

29. From “Of Mere Being” by Wallace Stevens:

“The palm stands on the edge of space.

The wind moves slowly in the branches.

The bird’s fire-fangled feathers dangle down.”

30. From “Suicide’s Note” by Langston Hughes:

“The calm,

Cool face of the river

Asked me for a kiss.”

31. From “Be Nobody’s Darling” by Alice Walker:

“Be an outcast;

Be pleased to walk alone

(Uncool)

Or line the crowded

River beds

With other impetuous

Fools.”

33. From “Litany in Which Certain Things Are Crossed Out” by Richard Siken:

“Dear So-and-So, I’m sorry I couldn’t come to your party.

Dear So-and-So, I’m sorry I came to your party

and seduced you

and left you bruised and ruined, you poor sad thing.

You want a better story. Who wouldn’t?”

34. From “Still I Rise” by Maya Angelou:

“You may write me down in history

With your bitter, twisted lies,

You may trod me in the very dirt

But still, like dust, I’ll rise.”

Suggested by Kalle M., via Facebook

35. From “Holy Sonnet X” by John Dunne:

“DEATH be not proud, though some have called thee

Mighty and dreadful, for, thou art not so.”

36. From “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud” by William Wordsworth:

“I wandered lonely as a cloud

That floats on high o’er vales and hills,

When all at once I saw a crowd,

A host, of golden daffodils.”

38. From “The Waking” by Theodore Roethke:

“I wake to sleep, and take my waking slow.

I feel my fate in what I cannot fear.

I learn by going where I have to go.”

39. From “Every Day You Play” by Pablo Neruda:

“I want to do with you what spring does with the cherry trees.”

40. From “A Question” by Robert Frost:

“A voice said, Look me in the stars

And tell me truly, men of earth,

If all the soul-and-body scars

Were not too much to pay for birth.”

41. From “Apology” by William Carlos Williams:

“The beauty of

the terrible faces

of our nonentities

stirs me to it.”

42. From “Sonnet 116” by William Shakespeare:

“Love is not love

Which alters when it alteration finds,

Or bends with the remover to remove:

O no; it is an ever-fixed mark,

That looks on tempests, and is never shake.”

44. From “Auguries of Innocence” by William Blake:

“To see a world in a grain of sand,

And a heaven in a wild flower,

To hold infinity in the palm of your hand,

And Eternity in an hour.”

45. From “Oh Yes” by Charles Bukowski:

“there are worse things than

being alone

but it often takes decades

to realize this

and most often

when you do

it’s too late

and there’s nothing worse

than

too late.”

46. From “Ulysses” by Alfred, Lord Tennyson:

“We are not now that strength which in old days

Moved earth and heaven, that which we are, we are;

One equal temper of heroic hearts,

Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will

To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.”